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20121001
20121009
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11 (some duplicates have been removed)
their lives. there is definite response to international law. turkey is a nato member. certain nato treaty articles bring about certain responsibilities when one of its members is attacked. we're not blinded by rage, but we will protect our rights. >> wednesday's violence marked the day this cross border flare- up between the two countries since the uprising in syria began nearly two years ago. there have been unconfirmed reports syrian troops were killed overnight. the syrian information minister said his government is investigating the attack and offered condolences to the turkish victims. >> the authorities are investigating what led to the death of the mother and her children near the syrian-turkish borders. we console the families of the mortar. >> the border violence between turkey and syria becamcame hours after dozens of people were killed in a series of bombings in aleppo. scores of iranians rallied in tehran wednesday to protest the collapse of the country's currency. it has had an all-time low amidst a worsening financial crisis brought upon by western sanctions fallen 40% again
it's again the law to deny the holocaust in many european countries. our notion of free speech, especially when it comes to religion, is not shared around the world. >> but is it changing? >> i think it is changing. as the world becomes smaller, we live in a globalized world, and people recognize as president obama said in his speech that someone with a phone camera can cause a stir around the world. we have to be able to adjust. we've got to be able to have a discourse and dialogue when it comes to difficult issues like this rather than take the streets and commit acts of violence. >> i found it interesting american muslims seem to be speaking to two audiences, in fact. on one hand you speak to muslims around the world, and you also speak to american society and trying to say not all muslims are like the people who are in the streets doing violence. has that been a challenge for you all? >> it is a difficult balancing act, but i think people realize that the majority of people out on the streets, they were a very small number. and amongst that small number the ones who committ
the song came as a shock. when i got at the record i gave it to my mother-in-law. she said [indiscernible] . >> he was no longer in charge. this man had taken over. it was a moment in pop history , but dealings were mixed in liverpool. part i remember feeling, how long will this last? we all knew this was a big thing. gone.nths later, it's ♪ ♪ >> for a 15-year-old singer it would never be the same again. after this came the madness. >> i'm from liverpool pant i used to sing 60 years ago -- and i used to sing 60 years ago. [indiscernible] it was beatlemania. >> tony barrow was asked to write a press release for the beatles. >> i said, yes. >> the sales, even though it made it to number one locally,. or disappointments >> what happened was people like the fans thinking if we've purchased this single, the beatles will be off to london and we don't want to do that, if we want to keep the beatles right here. >> its a great beginning of the beatles story in pop history, but something special here had come to an end. bbc news, liverpool. >> liverpool's loss was everyone else's gain. let me r
that the islands are an inherent part of japanese territory based on international law and in a lot of historical facts. >> gemba says the measures include running advertisements in overseas newspapers to counter chinese claims to the islands in the east china sea. the state affiliated "china daily" ran two-page ads last week in the "new york times" and "washington post." they refer to the islands daoyu, the chinese name for them. they said they accused japan and washington crafting back room deals to give control of the islands, care they call the deals invalid. car makers from around the world have gathered in china this week for an international auto show, but the strained relations are putting a dent in japan's participation. the international automobile show opened on wednesday with all the glitz and glitter that usually accompanies car shows. the latest models from 65 u.s., european and asian car makers on display. japan's toyota and nissan are there with the newest offerings, but other makers are noticeably absent. local affiliates decided not to take part in the wake of anti-japanese prot
ministry suggesting that the chinese telecommunications companies operate within the law, but they have gained their success through their own commercial competitiveness and that they should not be singled out by u.s. congressional committees for criticism in this way. so it appears the chinese government is already lining up in defense. this is a damning report from an official body singling out two companies by name and suggesting that they simply have not done enough over the course of this investigation to demonstrate that they are free from influence from beijing. >> my understanding is the foreign ministry has done slightly more than just condemn this. have they not said this is the result of some kind of prejudice in america of chinese companies? >> in a sense, that is in the context in which there is a kind of growing focus on the issues of their trade and open access. i think we are beginning to get the sense that china feels, particularly in the run-up to the u.s. presidential election, that it is being unfairly targeted. i think the foreign ministry statement times with some
pressed and the full force of the law obviously needs to play on that. the bigger issue about how a democracy fashion as proper conversation in fragmented societies is something that i think is very, very profound. but if you think about it, the gridlock you complain about, we can't get agreement in our country about building a third runway in heathrow airport, much less care about the elderly swrenchts the same problem. >> there is gridlock on syria, there is grid lock on the saving of the eu, there is gridlock at the national politics, and representative politics is facing a very, very buying set of charges, people feel they are not getting a proper say. now, there are reforms in every country that are going to have to be particular to that country, but there is a more generic issue about how in a world of multiaccess to information we have a proper conversation about how to take our countries forward. >> it is good to see you. >> very nice to see you. >> david miliband, former foreign minister and now a member of parliament in great britain. thank you for joining us. see you ne
their own military law reviews show ptsd and substance abuse-related misconduct are close the related, that there is a nexus that one comes from the other. what we are addressing -- we're not asking the military to not have people held accountable for misconduct. if you need to punish someone because they illegally or in violation of regulation of used the illegal substances, go ahead and punish them within the system, but that does not mean you up to go to the extent of imposing administrative sanctions that have an impact on the rest of their life such as taking away all their benefits and then putting a person without a safety net out into the community where they then become a problem in my community. and all they do is end of draining the resources of my community. and that can be within the criminal justice system, homelessness, domestic violence, child abuse, and the list goes on and on and on. there needs to be when it comes to addressing the issue of stigma, their knees to really be a revamping of -- there needs to be a revamping of how the ministration the ministers the puni
of international law. but i think seen from a strategic point of view both russia and china should have a self-interest in being so to speak on the right side of history. and i think that could be an argument for them in favor of delivering a clear and unified and strong message from the international community. >> rose: do you think it's a stalemate today? >> more or less it is a stalemate. with severe consequences for the people of syria. and i think the international community has a responsibility to deliver a very clear message to the assad regime that they must stop violence and initiate a process towards democracy in syria. no regime can in the long-term neglect the will of the people. >> rose: when you look at the balkans, we had an intervention without a u.n. resolution. nato acted without a u.n. resolution. can you imagine that happening in syria? >> testimony brief answer is no, but let me stress that nato acted on the basic of the principles of the u.n. charter when we took responsibility for the operation in kosovo. the operation aimed at preventing what we considered a genocide. b
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11 (some duplicates have been removed)